“Reducing Secondary Trauma in Clinicians: A new approach”

Presented by Brian Miller, Ph.D.

Facing compassion fatigue, burnout and vicarious trauma is challenging. As we raise awareness about self-care techniques, we must also expand our search for strategies that help treat anxiety and trauma into the broader neuroscientific and treatment literature. Here, we find important evidence-informed strategies for influencing the way professionals experience their time with clients, how they think about it, and how to “keep the energy moving” to help professionals be more resilient.

Join Dr. Brian Miller as he presents the CE-CERT model (Components for Enhancing Clinician Experience and Reducing Trauma) model, which is comprised of specific, defined skills to help therapists thrive. Compassion satisfaction occurs when we find our job rewarding even as we are doing it, not when we have sufficiently shielded ourselves from our job. In order to make that goal attainable, we must consciously oversee our affective experience as we work with clients.

Dr Miller will be identify five key clinical practice and supervision skills, and the foundational knowledge of the relevant neuropsychological, social cognitive, anxiety and trauma treatment literature from which they are drawn. These skills include; engaging and “metabolizing” intense affect; skills for decreasing rumination; conscious oversight of narrative; reducing emotional labor, and; parasympathetic recovery. Participants will gain key strategies to positively change their working experience.

Brian Miller is the Director of Children’s Behavioral Health at Primary Children’s Wasatch Campus In Salt Lake City, Utah.  Until recently, he directed the Trauma Program for Families with Young Children at The Children’s Center in Salt Lake City, a community mental health center serving preschool age children and their families. Dr. Miller has worked in a broad variety of treatment and mental health policy settings, including serving as the Salt Lake County Mental Health Director, Clinical Director of Davis Behavioral Health, Associate Director of the Utah State Division of Mental Health, and as a psychotherapist in private practice. He consults with behavioral health agencies on implementation of evidence-based practices, transforming practice to trauma informed care, and organizational supports for secondary traumatic stress in treatment providers. He holds a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was a Mandel Leadership Fellow. He currently serves as board president for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, Utah Chapter, and on the board of the Polizzi Clinic, a free clinic for behavioral health services in Salt Lake City.

 

“Grounded-Strategies for Staying Centered Under Pressure”

Working in trauma exposed environments can easily leave us feeling unbalanced.  In this workshop, Diana Tikasz will present a useful model to understand what happens to us internally as helpers throughout the course of our stressful days. The model helps us to continuously self-monitor and recognize when we are off centre.  The model alerts us to the need to re-set ourselves for optimal balance and wellness. Diana will teach strategies that will help you stay grounded and re-establish equilibrium when the stress related to trauma content has knocked you off balance.  She will discuss how to utilize these strategies before, during, and after exposure will be addressed.

 

Diana Tikasz has been committed to trauma-focused work in the health care sector for the past 20 years. She has coordinated hospital based sexual assault/domestic violence treatment programs, which involved counselling those who have been traumatized by violence, teaching other professionals how to do this work effectively while staying healthy themselves. Diana has also worked in the area of Employee Assistance Program counselling where she has specialized in working with individuals who are feeling stressed by their personal and/or work life. Her passion is to assist people in creating personal changes that promote health. Participation on numerous community and provincial committees, research projects and educational endeavors rounds out her professional interests.

 

REGISTER NOW

“What is the Cost of Unmanaged Conflict?”

By Meaghan Welfare, BA

Do you experience conflict at work? Are you a leader? Did you know that leaders spend up to 25% of their time dealing with conflict that could be addressed and solved at the source? Unmanaged conflict is costly. It affects the mental health of your people, which results in absenteeism, employee retention issues and a negative institutional reputation.  To attract and retain great employees, organizations must focus on their wellness, beginning with positive and productive relationship management. Meaghan Welfare is an expert in managing conflict within organizations while creating “conflict competence”. Her workshop will equip participants with organizational competencies designed to foster strong working relationships as well as detect and address inevitable workplace conflict.

Meaghan Welfare is a conflict management practitioner with the Department of National Defence at CFB Kingston. She is also a Certified Compassion Fatigue Educator with the Green Cross Academy of Traumatology. She holds a degree in criminology and criminal justice with a minor in law, a graduate certificate in dispute resolution from York University and a certificate in family mediation from University of Waterloo.

Grounding Techniques for the Trauma-Exposed Practitioner

 

This week, we highlight some of our exciting speakers and topics

Emotional Freedom Technique: Creating Personal Change through Tapping With Diana Tikasz, MSW.

Do you ever feel stuck? Do you ever wish things would change, that you could be different? You are not alone. Too often we set resolutions, goals, and personal vows only to slip up and reach for that TV remote, that third chocolate cupcake and that second glass of wine. Making emotional changes is tough; we fall back on old patterns and give up on our goals. But deeper, lasting change is possible…especially if you have fun!

In her session, Diana Tikasz presents a powerful tool for creating personal change. ‘Emotional Freedom Technique’ is a simple acupressure technique that allows us to dig deeper and address the beliefs that can often sabotage our efforts and keep us feeling stuck. EFT has been growing in popularity because the simplicity of the technique can be applied to a wide variety of complex issues.

This workshop will provide hands-on training in the basics of EFT, and highlight emerging research that reveals a direct calming of stress in the body when EFT is applied. Diana will help teach you ways to create deeper emotional change that will stick.  Be prepared to have fun and tap into your “silly side” as you learn this procedure. The session is designed to not only help you create your own personal change, but to also help others realize their goals.

Diana Tikasz, MSW has worked in the teaching and health care sector for the past 27 years.  Her helping work began as an early childhood educator nurturing children and their families to reach their fullest potential. Over the course of her career she has worked in emergency department crisis teams, coordinated hospital based sexual assault/domestic violence treatment programs, which involved assisting individuals experiencing a current crisis, counselling those who have been traumatized by violence, and teaching other professionals how to do this work effectively while staying healthy themselves.  She has also worked in various Employee Assistance Programs and private practise where she has specialized in working with individuals who are feeling stressed by their personal and/or work life. Diana grounds her work in current knowledge of the neuro-biology of stress and trauma and utilizes techniques/strategies that work on rebalancing holistically.  Her passion is to assist people in creating personal, professional, and organizational changes that promote optimal health and make us more effective helpers.

 For more information on CARE4YOU click here

How will you navigate the changing landscape of your work?

Has your work changed?

Is there more stress and uncertainty in your job than there used to be?

 

57% of Canadians report high levels of stress

 1/3 Canadians put work first and let it interfere with family

(Duxbury & Higgins, 2012)

 

In 1991, according to the Duxbury study on work-life balance, 46% of Canadians reported being satisfied with life. In 2012, it has plummeted to 23%. As many of you know first-hand, the recent economic downturn has led to significant budgetary compressions in the public purse. As a result, many of us working in the helping fields and in the civil service have experienced massive changes: layoffs, reorganizations, job abolitions, changes in mandate, elevated conflict and a lot of uncertainty and fear of what is yet to come. Over the past ten years, I have crisscrossed the country many times to offer compassion fatigue training in nearly every province and territory. During my workshops, I get to meet with public sector employees, health care workers and other helping professionals as well as with management and human resources. Lately, I have been hearing the same words from nearly everyone I meet:  “change”,  “stress”, “conflict”, “uncertainty” and “overload”.

Is this true for you as well?

Read More