TEND Associate Rebecca Brown on Workplace Compassion Fatigue

 

Rebecca Brown has a Master’s Degree in Social work and her career has spanned 28 years including medical social work, child welfare and domestic violence. For the majority of her career Rebecca was a Child Protection Team Supervisor at the Children’s Aid Society and was a founding member of the Critical Incident Debriefing Team for CAS staff following traumatic work events. She was a provincial trainer for the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies and taught the curriculum on Wellness and Self Care. Rebecca has recently been appointed as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine, Western University.

Rebecca now has a particular interest in Lifestyle Medicine and incorporates this into her practice of Wellness Coaching. Rebecca has been working with Francoise Mathieu and delivering workshops and seminars on the topics of Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue to helping professionals in a variety of social settings to balance the impact of the “cost of caring” for those in need.

New Course this fall – WTF: Essential Grounding and Debriefing Tools for Front Line Workers

Become more centered among the chaos

In the course of their work, many helping professionals are regularly exposed to difficult and sometimes traumatic material: anyone working in the criminal justice system, victim services, front line workers, those who work with forensic evidence and child exploitation, first responders, mental health crisis teams, homeless shelter staff and many others.

When there is a lot of exposure the risk for secondary trauma and compassion fatigue are high. How do we remain healthy and balanced while doing this challenging work? We need tools in our toolbox, skills that we can use before, during and after the difficult event has taken place. New research on grounding techniques and trauma reduction skills are showing promising results in helping to reduce secondary traumatic stress in trauma-exposed professionals.

This fall, we are delighted to begin bringing to you a brand new workshop designed by our very own Diana Tikasz, MSW, RSW. Diana has worked for many years in high stress, high trauma-exposed work settings and brings to this training her vast experience as a front line worker and supervisor, as well as the newest findings on the neuroscience of trauma exposure management.

WTF isn’t a swear word! It refers to the Window of Tolerance Framework. The WTF is our optimal zone – the place where we do our best work, when we are feeling calm yet energized, healthy and creative. Stressors and triggers can bring us out of that zone into high stress and reactivity, or into numbness and avoidance.

The techniques offered in this workshop will encompass the whole self as we can often retreat and get stuck in our heads. An emphasis will be on learning and incorporating strategies that change the way we work as opposed to using all our personal time to replenish what our work takes out of us.

This session will provide skills to help move yourself out of states of reactivity or avoidance and into the place of possibility to become more centered among the chaos. This is a crucial skill for front-line workers and others working with forensic evidence, investigations, court, witnesses and victims, and those working with individuals who have experienced difficult and traumatic experiences.

Those who would benefit are any folks in a helping profession that feel they are often overly stressed or hijacked by emotion, or those who are no longer enjoying their work and wondering whether they need to make a career change. Helpers who wish to learn specific skills that they can utilize to protect themselves in difficult situations whether it is working with those challenging clients, sitting in a difficult team meeting or interacting with a colleague who pushes your buttons. It is also for those who find that at times their personal lives are creating the WTF moments, which makes it extremely difficult to be present at work.

Diana: “I often say that helping work is even more difficult when the professional is going through their own personal stresses. We will focus on providing a framework and resources to help us navigate the storm. This workshop is especially for those who are feeling completely detached from what they are doing, feeling as though they are just “going through the motions” or counting down the days to retirement.”

 

 

 

 

Reflections from our team members

As you may know, TEND Academy is composed of a team of highly skilled, extremely dedicated professional individuals, all of whom work full time in the helping field in addition to providing training and education sessions for our little company.

At the start of this new year, I asked the TEND Academy associates to share their reflections on the work. Here are some of their words:

From Diana Tikasz, MSW, RSW: “I love a good snowstorm.  It invites us to slow down.  If we accept the invitation, we are rewarded with inherent stillness, beauty and wonder.  It creates an opportunity to pause, reflect, and reconnect.  It can be an occasion to reset ourselves and gain perspective as we gaze at each delicate snowflake falling.  As we take a second to pause,  we create awareness, and with awareness comes choice; the choice of how we wish to experience this moment and how we will step forward through the “storm”.  I wish you all the best the season has to offer and the possibility to explore the power of a pause.”

From Rebecca Brown, MSW, RSW: “As I reflect back over this past year, I am once again humbled and in awe of the amazing people I have had the privilege to meet through our connection with Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue.  I have been honoured to be in the presence of helpers and healers from such fields as Victims’ Services, Alzheimer’s Society, Special Education Teachers, Medical Staff, Educational Assistants, Probation Officers, and Camp Counsellors for Children with Cancer.  I am left with such a feeling of hope and a better appreciation for the capacity for resilience in people.  I am inspired to continue to make our workshops relevant and impactful, and it is with a renewed focus on resilience that I am looking forward to the New Year.”

and from Lori Tomalty-Nusca, RECE, RT.

“I love to do CF training sessions. I always walk away feeling that I have learned something from the audience, as I hear about different workplaces, different ideas and different aspirations to change a small part of life to make balance and self care important (as I feel it should always be). Everyone works so hard to make the lives of our clients/families better, and often we forget to celebrate the small successes that our clients have already made, because we, the helpers helped them along their journey. I especially love it when complete strangers come up to me at the end of a presentation, often with tears in their eyes, saying that they are inspired and are committed to change aspects their lives to make work/life balance better…it really is the best gift!

Happy New Year, and to all a good balance!!!”

For more information about TEND Associates, please click here.