“My kid got into college! Now what?” – a chat with Dr. Mike Condra

transition from high school to college

resources-podcast-dr-mike-condra-transitions-college

What is this podcast about?

The transition from high-school to college or university can be a very stressful time for students and their parents/guardians. Leaving home, challenging courses, meeting new people – it can all feel daunting and hard. Sometimes these compounding pressures can feel like too much. If that happens, what should a student do? Who do they turn to?  What are the best options?  For parents/guardians, what are the warning signs that your child is in need of some extra support?

Dr. Mike Condra, a veteran mental health expert with 20+ years of experience working at one of Canada’s top universities has advice to help prepare parents and students understand how to navigate and address the mental health needs of students at post-secondary school. Click here for Dr. Condra’s full biography.

Listen to the full podcast here:


Transition Resources from Dr. Mike Condra:

Beginning Post-secondary Education: Tips for Parents/Guardians PDF

Mental Health Student Handbook (English, French and Accessible versions available)

Bridges out of Poverty – resource recommendation

Bridges over Poverty, blog post, resources for compassion fatigue and trauma exposure

review by Françoise Mathieu, M.Ed., CCC., RP

Bridges out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals and Communities – a great resource to develop more compassionate and effective tools to support individuals who live in underprivileged communities.


If you work with folks who live in poverty, these challenges are often multigenerational, complex and very difficult to overcome. Whether your clients are inner-city dwellers with its host of challenges or are individuals trying to make ends meet in remote communities with a lack of basic public amenities and transportation services, this book is a fantastic resource.

Bridges out of Poverty, written by Dr. Ruby Payne, is both a book and an entire community-building program to enhance service providers’ understanding of the complicated layers and resiliency of those who live in chronic poverty.

I was introduced to the book several years ago by a lovely workshop participant from Nebraska who has been involved in bringing the program to his community. I read it from cover to cover as soon as I received it.

Ruby Payne does not only provide a template to assist people living in poverty gain better access to the supports they need, she also invites the reader to reflect on the admirable strengths, resourcefulness and resiliency of folks who have had to struggle to have even the most basic resources: shelter, food, jobs, transportation and much needed health care.

Those of you who have heard me speak in the past know that I am a firm believer that the key to compassion satisfaction and improved quality of care for everyone begins with developing a better understanding of the strengths and challenges of those we serve. This book is a great place to start.


Sources: 

Payne, R. K., DeVol, P. E., Smith, T. D., (2001) Bridges out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals and Communities. Houston: AHA! Process.